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SFGMC Current Tour




The San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus (SFGMC) is the world's first openly gay chorus, one of the world's largest male choruses[1] and the group most often credited with creating the LGBT choral movement.[2]

The chorus was founded by gay music pioneer Jon Reed Sims. Despite popular misconceptions, the group does not require that members identify as gay or bisexual. The eligibility requirements for SFGMC are to be at least 18 years of age, to self identify as a man, and to pass the audition process defined by the Artistic Director. Today, with a membership of over 300 voices, the SFGMC continues to present a wide range of music and perform for many different kinds of audiences. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Currently the Chorus is attempting to raise money for its members to engage in its Southern Concert Tour, which is at this point in time incredibly important to maintaining the freedom not just of LGBTQ individuals and communities, but all our communities: People of Color, Women CIS or Trans, the Working Poor and especially immigrants coming to our shores fleeing persecution and injustice. I am choosing to support one particular member of the Chorus who possesses a life long history of standing up against social injustice and prejudice. Greg Sandritter. Sandritter's history as a Social Justice Warrior began long before many of us within this generation even understood what those words meant. Despite what we may think, culture wars are important in either losing or winning wars of oppression against Fascism. The Chorus' current tour is essential in the coming culture wars that we be used to gain a foot hold in U.S. consciousness. I urge as many of you as possible to contribute to the Chorus' current tour as a means of resisting oppression.  





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